Common vi commands

dw – Deletes the
word that comes immediately after the cursor, including the space following the
word. The text is saved in a memory buffer.

de – Deletes the
word that comes immediately after the cursor, not including the space. The text
is saved in a memory buffer.

d$ – Deletes from
the insertion point to the end of the line. The text is saved in a memory
buffer.

dd – Deletes the
entire current line. The text is saved in a memory buffer.

p - Inserts the
text deleted in the last deletion operation after the current cursor location.

u - Undoes the
last action.

CTRL-G - Displays
a status line at the bottom of the interface. This displays the name of the
file, the total number of lines in the file, and the current cursor location.

/search_term -
Searches for the next instance of the term specified. For example, entering /init searches for the next instance of
the text “init” after the cursor. Pressing N
after executing a search will search for the next instance of the search
term.

Linux Common Commands

These are just some common linux commands from chapter 1of the Comptia Linux+ Certification book I’m reading.

halt – This command shuts down the operating system, but can only be run by the root user.

reboot – This command shuts down and restarts the operating system. It also can only be run by root.

init 0 – This command also shuts down the operating system, and can only be run by the root user.

init 6 – This command also shuts down and restarts the operating system. It also can only be run by root.

man – This command opens the manual page for the command or utility specified. The man utility is a very useful tool. If you are unsure how to use any command, use man to access its manual page. For example, you could enter man ls at the shell prompt to learn how to use the ls utility.

info – The info utility also displays a help page for the indicated command or utility. The information displayed tends to be more in-depth than that displayed in the man page for the same command.

su – This command switches the current user to a new user account. For example, if you’re logged in as tully and need to change to user account brett, you can enter su brett at the shell prompt. This command is more frequently used to switch to the superuser root account. In fact, if you don’t supply a username, this utility assumes that you want to change to the root account. If you enter su -, then you will switch to the root user account and have all of root’s encironment variables applied.

env – This command displays the environment variables for the currently logged-in user.

echo – This command is used to echo a line of text on the screen. It’s frequently used to display environment variables. For example, if you wanted to see the current value of the PATH variable, you could enter echo $PATH.

top – This command is a very useful command that displays a list of all applications and processes currently running on the system. You can sort them by CPU usage, memory usage, process ID number, and which user owns them.

which – This command is used to display the full path to a shell command or utility. For example, if you wanted to know the full path to the ls command, you would enter which ls.

whoami  – This command displays the username of the currently logged-in-user.

netstat – This command displays the status of the network, including current connections, routing tables, etc.

route – This command is used to view or manipulate he system’s routing table.

ifconfig – This command is used to manage network boards installed in the system. It can be used to display or modify your network board configuration parameters. This command can only be run by the root user.